Current Issue

Journal of Restorative Medicine

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO): An Interview with Preet Khangura, ND

Liz Sutherland, ND, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Restorative Medicine, recently spoke with Preet Khangura, ND, who practices in Victoria, BC, Canada. Dr. Khangura is an expert in the diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). He has developed treatment and prevention protocols for this condition, and offers consultations and educational seminars on the topic to healthcare providers.

Read Full Article
Journal of Restorative Medicine

Erectile Dysfunction: A Review of Comprehensive Treatment Options for Optimal Outcome

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common with aging. Formerly ED treatment was offered mainly by urologists, but the approval and widespread use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors has enabled primary care clinicians to provide targeted ED treatment. Although large, multicenter clinical trials have shown efficacy and safety with these drugs, they are ineffective in 30–35% of men, may cause side-effects, and do not improve the underlying pathology. A thorough understanding of erectile physiology and causes of ED and a comprehensive treatment plan addressing all contributing factors may be more effective than pharmaceutical management and may improve aspects of psychological and physical health beyond erectile problems.

Read Full Article
Journal of Restorative Medicine

Effect of the Anti-Inflammatory Diet in People with Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Feeding Study

Introduction: Inflammation underlies a variety of chronic medical conditions, including diabetes. The anti-inflammatory diet, one that excludes foods that may stimulate inflammation and includes foods that reduce inflammation, may improve inflammatory biomarkers in people with diabetes and pre-diabetes.

Study Design: Thirty participants with diabetes or pre-diabetes were randomized (2:1) in a controlled feeding study that compared the anti-inflammatory diet (n=20) to a control diet (n=10) based on the American Diabetes Association recommendations. Diets were matched for protein, carbohydrate, fat, and fiber content as closely as possible. Participants were fed an isocaloric diet for 2 weeks, followed by continued ad libitum feeding in their dietary group assignment for an additional 4 weeks. All meals were prepared by the study team.

Outcomes: Primary outcomes included inflammatory markers, including cytokines and hsCRP. Secondary outcomes included body weight and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Results: Both diets resulted in trends in reduced markers of inflammation, especially with weight loss. In addition, glucose, lipids, and triglycerides all trended downward, also non-significantly and equally in both groups.

Conclusion: Dietary change can improve inflammation as well as other cardiometabolic risk factors. In this study, the anti-inflammatory diet did not affect markers of inflammation more than the control diet.

Read Full Article
Journal of Restorative Medicine

The Crucial Role of Oxygen for Health

The human body is dependent upon oxygen for its survival. Yet, various factors such as aging, psychological stress, obstructive sleep apnea, exposure to cigarette smoke, living at high altitude, high-intensity exercise, or a sedentary lifestyle can all lead to a hypoxic state. Hypoxia may be involved in the pathogenesis of a number of disorders including impaired immunity, hormonal imbalances, fibromyalgia, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, depression, and anxiety. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and massage are two means by which to improve oxygen perfusion. Certain dietary supplements such as Ginkgo biloba, coenzyme Q10, and beetroot juice can increase oxygenation through enhanced blood flow while branched-chain amino acids and omega-3 fatty acids can improve maximum oxygen consumption V̇o2max. Additionally, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may reduce the incidence of sleep apnea while N-acetyl cysteine may protect against hypoxia injury related to sleep apnea.

Read Full Article
Journal of Restorative Medicine

You can also access full issues of the Journal of Restorative Medicine here.